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Find advice and tips on how to select your smoke alarme, heat and smoke detector, carbon monoxide alarm, Ionization Smoke Alarm and photoelectric detector to protect your home with EuroSmoke.com

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Why do you need smoke detectors?

Smoke detectors save lives. Increasingly, communities across the country report families saved from certain tragedy by the early warning provided by residential smoke detectors.

This early evidence of effectiveness points out an opportunity for dramatically reducing the residential fire deaths that occur every year in the United States.

There are two basic types of residential smoke detectors: ionization and photoelectric. The ionization detector uses a very small amount of radioactive material to produce electrically charged materials called ions. The photoelectric detectors use either an incandescent light bulb or a light-emitting diode (LED) to send forth a beam of light.

smoke detector Carbon Monoxide Alarm

smoke detector Carbon Monoxide Alarm

Electrochemical carbon monoxide sensor is the most accurate sensor available

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Contractor Pack Smoke Alarm with Battery Backup

Contractor Pack Smoke Alarm with Battery Backup

Smoke alarms hardwired with battery backup capable of wiring directly into your home electrical system.

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Smoke Alarm with Voice

Smoke Alarm with Voice

When every second counts, you'll have your warnings spoken to you in a loud-volume voice: Fire, Fire!

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Maintaining and testing residential smoke detectors are simple, routine, and extremely important procedures. Smoke detectors may be called upon only once, but that one time is crucial.

The ionization detector uses a small amount of radioactive material to make the air within a sensing chamber conduct electricity. When very small smoke particles enter the sensing chamber, they interfere with the conduction of electricity, reducing the current and triggering the alarm.
The particles to which the detector responds are often smaller than can be seen with the human eye.
Since the greatest number of these invisible particles are produced by flaming fires, ionization detectors respond slightly faster to open flaming fires than photoelectric detectors.

The photoelectric detector

The photoelectric detector uses a small light source, either an incandescent bulb or a light emitting diode (LED), which shines its light into a dark sensing chamber.
The sensing chamber also contains an electrical, light-sensitive component known as a photocell.
The light source and photocell are arranged so that light from the source does not normally strike the photocell.
When smoke particles enter the sensing chamber of the photoelectric detector, the light is reflected off the surface of the smoke particle, allowing it to strike the photocell and increase the voltage from the photocell.
This reflection of light is the same means by which we see smoke in the air. That is, light from the room strikes the smoke and reflects it to our eyes.
When the voltage reaches a pre-determined level, the detector alarms.

Sealed-Battery Ionization Smoke Alarm

Sealed-Battery Ionization Smoke Alarm

The First Alert(R) Sealed-Battery Ionization Smoke Alarm features a tamper-resistant lithium battery that provides a full 10 years of protection without having to change the batteries!

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Wi-Fi Smoke + Carbon Monoxide Alarm

Wi-Fi Smoke + Carbon Monoxide Alarm Apple home

The home kit-enabled onelink Wi-Fi smoke+carbon monoxide alarm and the free onelink home app on your iPhone or iPad work for your peace of mind, so you know your home is safer and truly just one link away.

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Flow Switch Activated Alarm

Flow Switch Activated Alarm

The Alarm flow switch activated alarm comes with a flashing light & horn. The unit activates when the flow of water to the fixture is detected.

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Heat detectors provide additional protection

Smoke detector users can obtain additional protection by installing heat detectors in unoccupied areas where smoke would be contained and delayed in reaching remote smoke detectors.
These areas include attics, garages, furnace or utility rooms, or any other small room normally closed off from the main portion of the house (by a closed door, for example).
In fact, some smoke detector manufacturers do not recommend placing their units in attics, garages, or furnace and utility rooms due to smoke detector sensitivity to temperature extremes and/or fumes.
Smoke from fires originating in these areas generally will not be detected by smoke detectors until they break into the living area (already protected by smoke detectors).
Therefore, these additonal heat detectors may impact on life safety.
Early warning of fires in both occupied and unoccupied areas could reduce property loss.
Prospective heat detector purchasers should look for units with the largest UL spacing rating than the larger the rating, the more rapid the heat detector response.

How many smoke detectors and where?

Extensive field tests show that installing a smoke detector on every level of a house provides the best all-around protection for the least investment. Though a smoke detector in every room will provide the fastest detection times, the modest increase in escape time may not justify the additional expense.

At the minimum, users should install a smoke detector in the hallway outside each sleeping area. The detectors should be close enough to the bedrooms so that the alarm can be heard with the bedroom door closed.
People who normally, sleep with the bedroom door closed may wish to consider adding an additional detector inside the bedroom. Since many home fires start in basements, homes with basements should have a detector on the basement ceiling at the entrance to the steps.


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